Bouncebackability

My Twitter friend and fellow Liverpool FC fan Marj introduced me to the term bouncebackability, which is a term coined by football manager Iain Dowie, supposedly referring to Crystal Palace FC’s ability to recover from conceding early goals (or obviously, as its name suggests, “the ability to bounce back,” but duh).

The term reminded me of a talk on leadership and communication, how the most effective leaders make use of a combination of intelligences to communicate, depending on certain situations. In crisis situations in particular, there is a need to utilize four factors: the intelligence quotient (IQ), the emotional quotient (EQ), the visionary quotient (VQ), and the adversity quotient (AQ).

Everyone already knows the first two, so there is no need to spend a great deal on them. The wisest ones, however, would know the right mix of IQ and EQ to utilize in getting their point across or effecting attitude shifts through communication (I still have to remind myself of this, as I fail time and time again).

What sets leaders apart from the rest of the population are VQ and AQ. Leaders know the destination or the Point B that much be reached from Point A. As VQ suggests, these are the ones with the big ideas (and necessarily, knowing how to translate these big ideas to reality—without that, they are just dreamers, not visionaries). However, an underlying theme suggests that employing VQ would mean having to see the forest for the trees (again, not many people are able to do such—local politicians, in particular, seemed to be fixated with semantics and polemics—defeating the mandate for which they were put in office, to begin with).

As for AQ, that is pretty much embodied by bouncebackability. Leaders are aware of the adversities and know just what to do what to overcome such challenges. They refuse to be bogged down by adversities. They can bounce back from a crisis. Come to think of it, AQ is largely utilizing IQ, EQ, and VQ to be able to bounce back.

Bouncebackability. I find the term inspiring, and I find that I have the great respect for people with tremendous bouncebackability.

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